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killed while shielding his friends from a gang members spraying fire on a city bus. his friend is here today marcus norris, hit in the face by a bullet that came through the wall of his house. thank god he survived. we are glad to have him here today. a true american hero who dedicated his life to serving his country and his community, killed by gang members with a straw purchase gone. i attended his funeral service. the officer's family is here, and his sister will testify today. there are many more in this room today whose lives and families have been changed by gun violence. i would like to ask the friends and family of the victims of gun violence to please stand. look about his room. understand that the debate we have before us has affected so many lives. thank you all for being here today. as we conduct this debate and honor your loved ones who are no longer with us, we know that we have to act. thank you for joining us at this hearing. senator cruz. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me say it is a particular honor to serve as ranking member on this committee with you and a particul
at the unemployed host: this was advanced by an act from the new york city council. what did it say? guest: the new york city council passed legislation to make it illegal to refuse to consider somebody for a job solely because they are unemployed. it does not mandate that employers must hire unemployed people. it does not even mandate that employers must interview unemployed people what it does say is that the status of being unemployed in and of itself is not a disqualifying job characteristic. it is not something that an employer could use to say she is not working so put her aside. it requires employers to consider all qualified applicants on a fair basis. host: if a person felt they were discriminated against, how could they prove it? guest: there is lots of concern about trial lawyers and lawsuits. people are going to need evidence. they will need to that job ad has line was that either explicitly or implicitly makes it clear that the unemployed are not welcome. they would need statements either from hiring professionals, people somewhere in the process, a lot of workers have called us over t
sales tax code in every city in which she does business. thankfully, she was willing to lend her time and expertise last year when i convened a task force of retailers, business owners, and tax experts to offer recommendations on how we can simplify our tax system. linda is here today. linda, please stand. we are all grateful for your tireless efforts. [applause]but we must do more than simply think our small business owners. we can adopt concrete steps outlined by linda and senate majority leader john macomb-ish. steps that will simplify our tax code, remove one more barrier to economic growth. and make arizona even more competitive. while we take these important steps to boost our economy, we cannot forget the most fundamental and lasting key to arizona's competitiveness, our schools. first, we have a responsibility to make certain our children have a safe place to learn. the massacre at sandy hook elementary was in unimaginable. we must take commonsense steps to lessen the likelihood of a similar tragedy striking arizona, while resisting the urge to turn our schools into a fortress
in the city in ohio and if i did not have a public pension i think that would have been working for the rest of my life. an earlier caller mentioned pensions being affected, but when this crisis happened, you had to have some faith in the economic system. when you look at what happened during the depression, we came out of it. i figured at that time that the country would eventually come out of it. where would we have been five years later? nowhere. i have a tendency to side with the republicans, but at the same time i still think that some of those protections were warranted for people. into the system you get so many people on fox news, knocking down public pensions. the average person in ohio makes about $26,000 per year. all of that talk about locking down those pensions is just bad, really bad, they should stop it. host: what is your pension look like? tell us about it. caller: it is not a bad tension. they did change this, it has changed. you are able to retire at 55, but they changed it to 57. you need 25 years in the system to do that. most people will go for 30 years in ohio. i am a
new york city. caller: good morning. what you just read in the article, it makes the case why religious institutions ought not to be tax-exempt and get all the tax breaks that they do. they are using their tax breaks to hire lawyers that are costing the taxpayers even more money to basically just have a normal secular society. this issue of birth control, the rest of the world is laughing at us that we are even controverting over it. it should not even be an issue on the table. again, the tax-exempt status for religious institutions, i do not know if there are organizations that are trying to repeal this tax-exempt status, but i never really heard of a program on c- span about it, but these organizations, these religious institutions -- it is the tax breaks they get. host: nick from fairview, tennessee. on the independent line. caller: this is a ploy. socialists like the kennedys and obama, they will vilify -- if they cannot get it right, kruschev said, we will take two steps forward, and one step backward. we no longer live under a constitutional republic. liberals claim that
. we can have a toy ooze city that looks cool. if all this ignores that all of these types of solutions, not a single study show they reduce gun violence or accidents. studies by -- i don't think anyone calls this partisan, they did one of these studies and papers and books and exhaustive research and could not find these sort of gun control measures did anything other than make politicians feel good. at the end of the day, this is about mental illness, it about keeping guns away from kids and felonies living with you and things like that. indeed, in colorado after columbine passed are allegations some called gun rights they have things such as increased tort liability of negligent storage of guns, strengthening restrictions on straw purchases. also, when something is designated a gun-free zone it is a gun-free zone with armed guards at the intenses instead of putting just stickers on the wall. fundamentally, the right to carry. this will reach the supreme court in the next couple of years maybe the next year. it protects the individual rights to keep and bear arms. what does bear arms
district on the city council went in a district 71% african-american to 30% african-american, and the only african-american member of the city council in that city in alabama lost his seat. so that to me seems like a perfect reason why we still need section 5. they drew the district in such a way that it resulted in the on black member of the city council losing his district. yes, this stuff happens in ohio and pennsylvania and wisconsin. but it happens more often, still, in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. and that's why section 5 so many different people across the legal spectrum are urging it be upheld. host: maverick rights in and says, the voting act law should expand to all states after seeing the obvious suppression attempts and tactics in the 2012 election. guest: well, if they are going to say it needs to be expanded, yes, that would then treat states the same. and particularly in terms of the evidence. ari keeps saying that there's more discrimination in covered states. that is simply not true. the facts do not bear that out at all. and if are you going to have sectio
top oggray and one moment one area is secure and others are not as secure. we know cities such as san diego and el paso count themselves having made great improvement and one might use the term operational control, because there are border stations. we know there are 1,993 miles of border, 651 miles of fencing and one might make the argument that the unfenced area is less secure. i would argue against that. one of the things that we need to ensure that we allow the border patrol to do is to advise us of how they believe using the right resources they can effectuate a secure border. but it is always moving. one of the issues that should be prominent in this such as 2004 in a member of this committee, we provided the answer to the original request by the border patrol and that is equipment. that was the year we presented all the helicopters, all of the jeeps, the lap tops, the night goggles and enhanced equipment. we know that those kinds of resources are not the only answer to border security. what i would like to see is to match your outcomes with the use of new technology, but tament
the youngest elected city councilman. his brother serbs in the u.s. house of representatives. we're pleased to have the mayor with us today and i will turn to the gentleman from texas -- a gentleman from texas. >> thank you very much. the mayor is particularly well placed and you need for this role as a witness today. i would like to welcome him as a fellow texan and i know that his brother has already done so. as the mayor of one of the world's international cities who sees people coming from all backgrounds, you are well placed to understand what immigration and the opportunities and contributions that immigrants and those to come to this country for a better opportunity can contribute and i thank you so very much for the leadership of your city. welcome. >> thank you. i turn to the former chairman of the committee and the gentleman from san antonio, texas, mr. smith. >> i will try to stick to the 15. i wanted to welcome the mayor of my home town. san antonio is a wonderfully livable city and you have done a great job representing us. i want to say to you that i enjoy serving with your br
way tonight in new orleans. alex is joining us next from new york city. caller: my comment is -- i am not particularly a sports fan. it seems very repetitive back and forth. as far as the regulation -- my observation, not just about football but hockey and also even baseball -- people seem to like people getting hit and getting beat up. they even like people looking kind of distorted like when they take drugs. i would be in favor if there could be a lot to prevent head injuries or young people being persuaded to do drugs to get onto teams or whatever. it is my commentary to my fellow americans the sunday morning that, it is like gladiatorial combat. . "the hunter games." it is almost like a freak show you enjoy watching human suffering. that is my cheery comment. host: thank you for the call. on the twitter page, there is this. back in 2009, tiki barber testified on the issue of head injuries at the high school and professional lover -- level. [video clip] >> you hear the file but comes from people who think the nfl is not addressing this issue. at the end of the day, it is a player p
among the free blacks in particular, of raising money for the downtrodden in the city. and during the war she was a volunteer nurse. so what can i tell you? i think she really personified a lot of the things we think of today as the role of the first lady. >> who enjoys the of first lady the most? if you want to use the word "detested," who would you put on that list? >> julia grant. suddenly she had a pedestal to be on and she absolutely adored it. she loved it and try to persuade him to run for a third term. he didn't, she didn't like it. she tells how they got on the train to leave washington and she fell and wept and wept. she claimed her place in later life and would come back in great glory to the white house. i do not know if anyone hated it. mrs. franklin pierce came in under horrible circumstances, having lost two sons. one of the way to the white house. -- one in a train wreck on the way to the white house. she was a pretty good politician and she was as smart lady and was involved in political things that she just did not have the heart for it. at one point she fell in
students across this country and in the city of chicago walk out and they see the promise of downtown, do they see their future as part of that opportunity or do they see a different future? and that is how we measure success. the two places where we can bridge that gap between where our kids are today and the promise of this city and the promise that this city holds are in the classroom and in the home. president obama understands that to connect all americans to that vision of a promising future requires that we create real ladders of opportunity. i am pleased he has come home to expand on that vision. ladies and gentlemen, let's give the president a chicago welcome. [playing "hail to the chief"] [applause] >> hey, chicago. hello, chicago. hello, everybody. hello, hyde park. [cheers] it is good to be home. it is good to be home. everybody have a seat, y'all relax. it's just me. y'all know me. it is good to be back home. a couple of people i want to acknowledge -- first of all, i want to thank your mayor, my great friend rahm emanuel for his outstanding leadership of the city and this ki
, small businesses budgets, cities budgets, churches budgets, schools budgets. my state of north carolina budgets. but washington does not. instead, year after year budgetless washington spends every single cent of the money it takes from the american people and $1 trillion more. not since 2009 has the democrat senate bothered to pass a budget. and not since 2010 has president obama submitted his plan for a budget on time. when you don't plan, it's easy to overcommit, and when a country overcommits year after year after year, it ends up $16.4 trillion in debt. that doesn't just rob our future, it hurts americans looking for jobs today. while government spending ballooned $8.5 -- 8.5 million more people have given up looking for work since 2009. mr. speaker, the unchecked spending has got to stop. it's time to get this government on a budget. it's time for the president to submit a credible plan. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from connecticut seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute. revise and
that wisconsin is a state and that there are cities inside of it. if i say i like wisconsin there are a whole bunch of interest that passed it off of that. he need to understand that hierarchy of objects. you also need to understand how they relate to each other. >> does this personalization become complementary to search, does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide you with information. there's also a very powerful social component because we can show you interests you may have in common with peo
to expand the voucher program. in the city of milwaukee, they have involved in the voucher program 112 private schools. almost 35,000 students. the total costs overall is 150 $4000. 30 eight percent comes from public school funds. another 62% of general revenue in the state. -- 38% comes from public school funds. another 62% comes from general revenue in the state shou. guest: acer does a model for a lot of voucher -- it served as a model for a lot of voucher programs around the country. states found that students performed at about the same level as traditional public schools in milwaukee. in a recent study out of the university of arkansas shows positive results for students with vouchers. i believe the program has been shown pretty strong results in terms of graduation rates. the milwaukee voucher is held up as a model. the opinions of it will break down pretty much along the lines of voucher programs all over. governor walker believes that parents are buying into the program and it is proving popular. it might prove popular in other school districts around wisconsin. host: we are t
. host: you cannot find a minimum wage job? caller: jobs in my city are very hard to come by unless you know exactly where to look. i have three scholarships. i'm trying to get a job on campus to help pay my debt. jobs are in very high demand. it is difficult. i am trying. hopefully, with the president's new policies, this could be more of an easy process. host: what is the minimum wage in oregon? caller: it was recently raised by our governor to $8.95. i cannot be certain about that. i've only read one article. host: i know there are websites out there that look at the minimum wage across the states. here's the new york times -- different economic arguments for minimum-wage, something that surely will be debated in the days after last night's state of the union address. on twitter -- let's go to brian in maryland, democrat. caller: good morning. president obama's speech was refreshing. as a proud member of the u.s. armed services that served our country more than 20 years, but we are focusing on domestic agendas and trying to invest money right here in the united. united so that was ve
a few years ago i found myself sitting next to the mayor of salt lake city and he was a nice guy and we started talking about what i do for a living and i told him i work to encourage young women and girls to run for a political office. why, he said? which stumps me because in my world, the question of why we need more women, is not a question but how do we get more women there. he went on to say i have two daughters, i have a wife, i have a more, he said, i know what women need and what can women do in office that i can't do? and it was an interesting question and he had no idea what a can of worms he was opening by getting into this conversation with me because i really believe no matter how well intentioned a man in office is, his decisions are never going to be as strong if you have men and women legislating together. i'm happy to say in the years i started doing this work is the world has come around to this idea, the idea is we need to add women to leadership, not because it's fair or it's the right thing to do but because adding more women to leadership is going to make stronger
. new york city deputy chuck spoke to the governors about the importance of this meeting. mr. ginn, we are pleased to have be here to discuss plans for the network and how states can work together to ensure the success. good afternoon. >> thank you. it is a real pleasure to be here. i would like to think nga, heather, and her staff and all of the governors to worse on the -- who worked on the passing of this legislation. it actually allocated $7 billion so that we can engineer a nationwide network that is interoperable, secure, reliable, and most of all, local control. if you think conceptually about what we're trying to do here, we are trying to put wifi across your entire state and then you can plug in the capabilities you want and the degree to which you want them and the amount you want them to run your state. it is important to say this. the first question we typically get is this is going to be a nationwide network and we will lose local control and we will not be able to run our own operations. that is that conceptually what we are talking about here. we are detecting a national
stations, small cities in rural areas. would you implement these reductions -- are these the type of reductions will see as a result of sequestration that would disproportionately affect rural america versus urban america? >> there are definitely risks. they will face a cut of $600 million under sequester, a vast majority will be furloughed for one day for the rest of the year. this is going to reduce air traffic levels across the country, causing delays. it is my understanding that there will be a curtailment of service at low activity airports. there will be impacted and feel the effect of the sequester. >> he mentioned that the air force plans to cut facilities and maintenance project by about half, including cuts to 189 projects. do you have a list? >> i can provide you with that level of detail. it is basically everywhere. >> one of the things i am concerned about, if we do go and the sequestration, i have heard that they may have to reduce flying hours by as much as 18%. and very quickly, can you tell us how how that will affect the air worthiness of our pilots? the reality
different from someone who grew up in a farm, somebody who grew up in an inner city. there are different realities and we have to respect them. but what we know is that majority of gun owners know that 100 or 1,000 more of our children are shot or killed in a senseless fashion. there are common sense steps we can take to build a consensus around -- we cannot shy away from taking those steps. bottom library is, people we have a lot of work -- bottom line is, we have a lot of work to do. it won't be simple, there will be frustrations. there will be times where you guys are mad at me. i will occasionly read about it. but, as long as we keep in mind why we came here in the first place. as long as we think back to whatever inspired each of us to say maybe i can give something back. maybe i can make a difference. maybe my purpose here on earth is to not just think about what is in it for me but what is in it for the broader community, for my neighborhood, for my state, for my cune. we need to keep that in mind every day, i have no doubt that we will continue our extraordinary progress that we'
-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools, the city university of new york, and ibm, students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. [applause] four years ago, we started race to the top -- a competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards, for about 1 percent of what we spend on education each year. tonight, i'm announcing a new challenge to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math -- the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. now, even with better high schools, most young people will need some higher education. it's a simple fact -- the more education you have, the more likely you are to have a job and work your way into the middle class. but t
city tennessee, or public in line. caller: yes. i want to make a comment. i think obama and handle -- hagel percent ace two state solution. is that correct or not? guest: at some point, that is their ultimate goal, yes. caller: don't you think that would make the situation worse, they are trying to divide it? the bible says that god is against that. dividing the land of israel. guest: i think that is a whole separate show on what to do in that region. it is far too complex to get into at this point. senator hagel has been very clear that he supports the president's approach to the region. host: talk about when senators are getting prepared. do they get a briefing book? how is that done? guest: they get some of that from the administration. the committee takes a set -- slightly different approach. the committee staff will also look at that. it is not the committee's job to rubber stamp the nominees. they will take their own look and prepare their own materials for specific members that they asked but also generally for the committee. certainly in an instance like this, i think the r
of the inner cities, the towns. i live in a well-known mennonite area, and they are coming up here. why? pennsylvania welcomes them with open arms, will not turn them in to immigration, and i will tell you one thing -- it will lead to either a race war or a revolution. host: mark, we got your point. let's get your response from deepak bhargava. guest: that call illustrates that there are deep anxieties about immigration and the changing face of america. in a few short years this will be a color nation. part of the republican stance is shaped by the election results were an overwhelming number of latinos voted for the president. there clearly is no path for a political party that is not willing to speak to the needs and concerns of the entire population. the anxiety that you see, we see younger americans much more supportive of a path to citizenship, older americans less willing to see that happen -- this is part and parcel of the change we are going through as a country. the president's point, that we cannot think of this as them against us is critical. we are all american, this is part
the america people. people can say that rome is burning or the cities and towns of economy are asking us to finally answer the question. under the laws that we adhere to, the president has a right to submit his budget. that should be very clore. no legislation here on the floor is going to dictate the president's budget. there is a law that is supposed to be said the first monday in february. we will admit that. what president has ever had -- what president has ever had the hostage-taking of the debt ceiling so you can't write a budget if there are individuals in the congress that won't do the normal business which is to raise the debt ceiling so that the american people can be taken care of? as we speak, however, the president has introduced today a short-term fix to avert the sequester. the democrats have offered a way of avoiding the sequester. we have nothing from the republicans except a resolution that says a request for a plan. the very plan that the president knows by law he's going to submit as long as he knows what is the amount of money we have to work on and of course the bud
-american relations. he will reconnect with the city in which he lived as a child. we expect international support from mali. italy, in additional to meeting senior officials, he will have a number of multilateral meetings and meet with european allies. we expect italian authorities will invite some of the key countries for the opposition coalition. the secretary will have a chance to meet with the leadership of the counsel separately. he will meet with turkish officials to discuss viral -- bilateral and multilateral issues that we work on together, including ending the crisis in syria and our ongoing cooperation in the area of counterterrorism. in cairo, he will meet with senior egyptian officials and other key political stakeholders, civil society leaders and with the visiti buss community. to encourage political consistence -- consensus and move forward on economic reform. he will take the opportunity to meet with the arabic secretary on our shared challenges. he will meet with the senior saudi leadership to a trust our cooperation on a broad range of issues. he will have a chance to have a mee
and dinners. and my governor will in louisiana must have taken 20 trips to different states and cities during the republican convention that was going on and he still lost. i'm independent. i didn't really care who won. i'm independent. i feel like as republican is for the rich white your democrat for the poor blacks independents is for everybody. i don't care. the -- host: the question the specific question for our guest? guest: the specific question is why do you have to cut spending that's going to help the poor and help the people that's in need in health care and help people that get into trouble and all that? guest: one of the thing that is you'll see if you look at the budgets of states across the country, certainly my states, most across the country over the last many years the amount of money that we spend on health care specifically which i think is what the caller was asking about has been increasing significantly. and it's a challenge. and because of that and the fact that we have limited resources at the state level unlike at the federal level where they can just essentially borr
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
's energy independence. for instance, the los angeles city council recently approved a 25-year, $1.5 billion project to buy solar power produced at the moapa band indian nation in the southern nevada desert. when it goes on line in 2016, it will be the largest solar power plant on tribal lands, capturing desert rays to power over 118,000 los angeles homes. in addition, to the plant itself, over 900,000 solar panels will be built on the reservation, creating more jobs and industries of tomorrow. one way to ensure we see more projects like this is to promote fair, equitable tax policy. like all governments, tribes must be able to collect and manage their own taxes, but right now, tribal governments don't have the same taxing authority or ability as states. as local governments and the federal government. we will continue working with our federal partners to fix these policies so that the economies of indian countries grow and become a south of strength in our family of nations. tribal sovereignty is how we can secure our communities, it's how we can secure our nations and it's how we will secu
, but i was wondering how risky it might be to have a city -- a sitting president working for or raising money for a 501c4. >> i have not attempted to separate my comments -- i do represent organizing for action, which is the name of the organization you are referring to. i would simply say as you know, i will not be involved in electoral activity at all. to bet sense, it's not confused with activity in an election cycle, the types of concerns the campaign finance sector we're talking about here today. as you know, it is devoted to federal and state public policy and issue development advocacy. it will be operating therefore as a social welfare organization. without going into tremendous amount of discussion about people's views of the feasibility of such an enterprise, i would say this -- the business of communicating on issues in this country and involving one's self in the day- to-day business of grass-roots requires resources. the largest issue we all face is in a country of this size and complexity and even with developments like internet communications which have reduced the cost o
're they organized into hierarchies? for example, you need to know wisconsin is a state in their cities from there. if i say i like wisconsin, there are a whole bunch of interests that cascade off of that. you need to understand the hierarchy of objects. you also need to be able to understand how they relate to each other, synonyms, duplication. >> does this personalization large internet companies has you have to understand what the ontology of entities is. does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide
these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for all americans. i was debating whether it should be johnson or jimmy carter. jimmy carter, in the final history of this country is written, jimmy carter will be among the best up there, not ronald reagan. look what jimmy carter did, by holding to signing treaties with panama, he gave the panama canal back to the panamanians. george bush's father arrested noriega and put him in jail. thank you. host: the washington post editorial page weighs in on the question -- who gets the washington post this morning on past presidents. iowa, democratic caller, lisa. caller: good morning. president roosevelt. he was the first president i can rememberhcane helped elderly people who did not have anything. i think he started social security. he had a disability, but it did not stop him from being the best president we ever had and never will. host: what would your parents etc. this question? >> they would've said the same thing if they were alive
reductions in contract hours and flight service stations, small cities in rural areas. would you implement these reductions -- are these the type of reductions will see as a result of sequestration that would disproportionately affect rural america versus urban america? >> there are definitely risks. they will face a cut of $600 million under sequester, a vast majority will be furloughed for one day for the rest of the year. this is going to reduce air traffic levels across the country, causing delays. it is my understanding that there will be a curtailment of service at low activity airports. there will be impacted and feel the effect of the sequester. >> he mentioned that the air force plans to cut facilities and maintenance project by about half, including cuts to 189 projects. do you have a list? >> i can provide you with that level of detail. it is basically everywhere. >> one of the things i am concerned about, if we do go and the sequestration, i have heard that they may have to reduce flying hours by as much as 18%. and very quickly, can you tell us how how that will affect the air
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